The Equanimity of Drunks: being a transliteration of the Four Immeasurables

May I be free from a judging mind and the fancy of birds;
     and welcome the moment uncluttered with the sound of loose change.
May those that surround me know me as I know myself.
May I see through the haze of stale smoke and regurgitated dream.

May I welcome happiness and the coy smile of foxes;
     and experience the embrace of lovers and the tears of widows.
May the dance welcome me with open arms and flailing limbs.
May I see through the haze of stale smoke and regurgitated dream.

May I be free of harm, the sting of hornets and the plots of wolves;
     and accept the barroom floor as it rises to greet me.
May I experience arms helping me to uncertain feet.
May I see through the haze of stale smoke and regurgitated dream.

May I enjoy life without the crack of a drivers’s whip;
     and see the trees as the carriage rushes by over rutted roads.
May I weather the cry of the newly-born; the gasp of the newly-departed.
May I see through the haze of stale smoke and regurgitated dream…

…look upon blue skies, prairie fire and scrub oak and see from a distance
           that the man waving is indeed welcoming me
              and not simply drunk.

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Inspired by The Four Immeasurables by Ken McLeod

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2 thoughts on “The Equanimity of Drunks: being a transliteration of the Four Immeasurables

  1. Favorite line: “accept the barroom floor as it rises to greet me.” Acceptance of the drunk delusions… the veil of ignorance.

  2. @jamisonwiggins Yes, I love using a barroom as a metaphor for samsara. It is full of life and excitement but also escapism and addiction. There is a wonderful poem by, I think Langston Hughes or Claude McKay, where a dancer is swaying to music but in desperation and not joy. Stuck in samsara with nothing left to do but dance until exhaustion.

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